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Best kept secret: Summer School

By Brett Eaton Office of Communications and External Relations
Class on the Quad

Summer School at Wake Forest is an excellent bargain for Wake Forest students and the children of University employees. For current students, academic credit hours cost less than half of the amount charged during the fall and spring semesters. For the children of qualifying Wake Forest faculty and staff, tuition in the summer sessions is free.

“This is a wonderful fringe benefit for University employees,” said Associate Dean for Special Academic Projects Toby Hale. “And the benefits of summer school at Wake Forest are even better than the tuition rate.”

“Summer is becoming an important part of academic planning for many families,” Hale continued. “The intensity of instruction makes it possible for students to earn enough credits to graduate early, pursue opportunities during the fall or spring semester to study abroad, pursue a double major or a particular minor.”

Tyler Haddad ’12

“I have taken Spanish classes in the fall and spring semesters and can attest that the summer program is the best way to learn Spanish. Not only that, but I truly enjoyed coming to class every day. The professors instilled such a strong enthusiasm for the language that I now intend on further studying Spanish in an advanced immersion program.

“To enter as a student who just wanted to finish off a requirement and become one who has obtained a new interest and hobby in just six weeks is truly remarkable.”

Read more testimonials about the benefits of Summer School at Wake Forest »

Hale added that students have more energy and time to devote to their studies during the summer while taking a lighter course load than during the regular academic year. With smaller class sizes, there is also greater opportunity for interaction with faculty members.

Mary Alyce McCullough enrolled in Organic Chemistry II during the summer of 2011. “Even though the course moved through material at a faster pace than a semester long course, having the time to work and study in a focused way helped me concentrate and feel comfortable with the material,” she said. “Taking the course during the summer was the best decision I could have made. I was able to fully dedicate myself to a subject and perform to the best of my ability.”

The 2012 Summer School offers two five-and-one-half week terms, with the option of taking one or more courses for a maximum of two courses of not more than 8 credit hours per term. A maximum credit load in both terms is the equivalent to a full semester’s work at Wake Forest. Many of the basic courses required for the baccalaureate degree are offered, as well as a variety of advanced and elective undergraduate and graduate classes.

Session 1 will be offered between May 29-July 3 and Session 2 will be offered from July 9-August 11. Currently enrolled Wake Forest students can register beginning March 19. Applications are currently being accepted from students enrolled at other institutions.

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