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Students Cecilia Rambarat and Julian Gilyard conduct an experiment together.

New eyes on science

Four undergraduate students and their computer science professor, Sam Cho, were recognized for their fresh perspectives on developments in the field of molecular dynamics computer simulations — the subject of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

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Wake Forest’s World Cultural Festival

You might not expect to be able to see a dance performance in West Africa, stop in China for a snack, and then finish up the evening in Italy for a quick game of bocce ball. But thanks to the World Cultural Festival, it is all possible.

David Hughes works on software for Intel's Connected Wheelchair Project.

Internship on the world’s stage

David Hughes (’15), a computer science major, spent the past five months working on Intel’s Connected Wheelchair Project, which was unveiled at Intel’s annual development conference held mid-September in San Francisco. The Connected Wheelchair Project received international attention as a result of an endorsement from world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking.

Media Advisory: Students, faculty, staff and friends will ‘Hit the Bricks’

In 2003, students at Wake Forest University started a tradition of running an eight-hour relay race along the brick pathways on campus to raise money for the Brian Piccolo Cancer Research Fund. The race honors Piccolo, an alumnus who attended the University in the 1960s and became a running back for the Chicago Bears. His […]

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Recognized for addressing stress

U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges 2015 guidebook, which hits newsstands this week, highlights Wake Forest’s leadership in the national trend of promoting students’ social and emotional wellbeing. The story shows how schools like WFU tackle stress to provide a better environment for students.

Media Advisory: WFU Museum of Anthropology features Day of the Dead exhibit

The Wake Forest Museum of Anthropology is showcasing its annual Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) exhibit, “Life After Death: The Day of the Dead in Mexico,” through Dec. 12, 2014. What: Día de Muertos is celebrated in Mexico over several days coinciding with the Catholic observances of All Saints’ and All Souls’ Days (Nov. 1 and […]

Professor Ron Neal  explores connections between hip hop and religion.

What can religion teach us about Jay-Z?

Students in professor Ron Neal’s religion class explore the connections between hip hop and the stories we’ve all grown up with as Americans — the idea of the self-made man, the achievement of the American dream and the belief that hard work will lead to the good life.

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Homecoming for Melissa Harris-Perry

Melissa Harris-Perry, MSNBC host and author, returned this fall to her alma mater as a professor in the politics and international affairs department. In an interview with Wake Forest Magazine, she reflects on her student experience at Wake Forest and why she loves teaching.

Campus Kitchen executive board members and volunteers prepare meals for local residents in its new space in Kitchin Residence Hall.

A new home for Campus Kitchen

On Friday, Sept. 19, the Campus Kitchen at Wake Forest University will hold a grand opening for its new home in the heart of campus. Officially opening its doors in 2006, the Campus Kitchen at Wake Forest has continued to grow every year since.

As "These Shining Lives" dramaturg, Mike Griggs spent months researching the time period to provide an accurate representation of the 20s and 30s. Left to right: Alyssa Gera as Charlotte, Johanna Beach as Catherine, Natalie Brashear as Frances and Hayley Greenstreet as Pearl.

Play shines light on Radium Girls’ history

Mike Griggs (’15) has been working with theatre professor Cindy Gendrich to hone his skills as a dramaturg. While a little unusual that Griggs auditioned and was cast for smaller roles in the play, “These Shining Lives,” it was important to him to gain professional experience researching, developing and acting in a play.