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Chinese New Year

The Chinese New Year is one of China’s largest holiday celebrations and emphasizes family and tradition. This year marks the year of the sheep, which is known for being gentle, sensitive and creative.

Maya Angelou began teaching at Wake Forest as Reynolds Professor of American Studies in 1981.

Celebrating Maya Angelou’s legacy

Wake Forest and the Winston-Salem community celebrated the legacy of Dr. Maya Angelou at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art. The celebration was inspired by a Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies class project.

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Pro Humanitate in the ‘City of Joy’

Students are volunteering in Calcutta, India in the spirit of the University’s motto of Pro Humanitate, “for humanity,” by serving, teaching and using what they have learned to make the world better for everyone.

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#WFULovefeast: sharing the love

From North Carolina to Texas to Uganda, Wake Foresters shared their lovefeast moments and memories using the hashtag #WFULovefeast.

Junior Kali Vicars, studied the painting "Witch Duck Creek" by Joshua Shaw (1820-1821) at Reynolda House Museum of American Art for her Women and Gender in Early America history course.

Art history detectives

History professor Michele Gillespie usually includes class visits to view art in Winston-Salem. This semester, she expanded the idea to benefit both the students in her Women and Gender in Early America course and the local museums.

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The 50th Lovefeast: A celebration around the world

Christmas decorations, music, and the smell of sweet coffee filled Wait Chapel as more than 2,200 students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of the University gathered to celebrate the 50th Annual Lovefeast.

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A treasured holiday tradition

On Sunday, Dec. 7, Wake Foresters, near and far, will celebrate the 50th Annual Wake Forest Lovefeast, the largest Moravian-style lovefeast in North America and a favorite Wake Forest tradition.

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Breaking down barriers

To help commemorate the 25th anniversary of the end of oppression in East Germany, students decorated a section of the Wake Forest “Berlin Wall” – four, nine-foot walls that were on display on Manchester plaza – in response to the question, “what walls hold you back?”

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Wake Forest’s World Cultural Festival

You might not expect to be able to see a dance performance in West Africa, stop in China for a snack, and then finish up the evening in Italy for a quick game of bocce ball. But thanks to the World Cultural Festival, it is all possible.

As "These Shining Lives" dramaturg, Mike Griggs spent months researching the time period to provide an accurate representation of the 20s and 30s. Left to right: Alyssa Gera as Charlotte, Johanna Beach as Catherine, Natalie Brashear as Frances and Hayley Greenstreet as Pearl.

Play shines light on Radium Girls’ history

Mike Griggs (’15) has been working with theatre professor Cindy Gendrich to hone his skills as a dramaturg. While a little unusual that Griggs auditioned and was cast for smaller roles in the play, “These Shining Lives,” it was important to him to gain professional experience researching, developing and acting in a play.