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A programmer’s approach to problem solving

An iPhone app developed by a team of Wake Forest freshmen could one day enable patrons at campus restaurants to vote for what songs play over the speakers.

Stretching about 25 miles long and located about 50 miles off the coast of Belize, Lighthouse Reef Atoll is one of the most pristine marine environments in the Caribbean Sea due to its remote location.

Diving into biodiversity

Lighthouse Reef Atoll is one of the most pristine marine environments in the Caribbean Sea due to its remote location. Students taking an Ecology and Conservation of Coral Reefs class spent their spring break exploring the Atoll’s startling array of biodiversity.

Students in the photo are from left to right:
Andy Bowline, Alison Arter, Kyle Murrah, Janel Suburu, John Hodnette and Gonzo Estupinan

From bench to bedside

Move over, pink. The fight against breast cancer now wears Old Gold and Black as a team of graduate students from Wake Forest Schools of Business, Law and Medicine work together to take a promising, but underfunded, cancer therapy to market.

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The birds and the bees of proteins

The birth of a protein is one of the most fundamental aspects of life as we know it, yet, surprisingly, there is still a lot that scientists do not know about them. A split-second snapshot of the mysterious process developed by Wake Forest researchers could someday lead to more effective antibiotics.

The image shows the flight path of the zone over the coal ash pond.

3D model measures coal ash spill

With a 3D model created using aerial images from an unmanned aircraft, Wake Forest researchers have received widespread national media attention by providing a new look at the extent of coal ash contaminants recently leaked into a North Carolina river.

Wake Forest sophomore Tim Lee ('16) demonstrates the robot arm that he has programmed to paint pictures, in Huffman Residence Hall on Friday, January 24, 2014.

Painting robot lends surgeons a hand

Would you let an artist perform life-saving surgery on you? You might someday, if the artist is a painting robot. Timothy Lee (’16) built a robotic painting arm that could one day lend doctors a hand in practicing complex, robot-assisted surgeries without having to step foot in an operating room.

MASus

Plotting a green career path

A new masters program created by Wake Forest’s Center for Energy, the Environment & Sustainability (CEES) will give students and early career professionals the diverse skillset they need to carve out a place in the burgeoning global sustainable business market.

Seniors Erin Hellmann and Logan Healy-Tuke, student co-founders of The Ashley Explorers Saturday Academy.

Student Storytellers: Saturdays with math and jicama

Erin Hellmann (’14) and Logan Healy-Tuke (’14) founded The Ashley Explorers Saturday Academy to strengthen the reading and math skills of elementary students in Winston-Salem.

Wake Forest sophomore Yinger "Eagle" Jin ('16) demonstrates his wave-powered electric generator in the pool in Reynolds Gym. The system harnesses the wave action as it compresses air inside the tube, which turns a small turbine that generates electricity.

Pool Power

Sophomore Yinger ‘Eagle’ Jin has come up with a way to turn waves in the Reynolds gym pool into electricity. The mathematical formulas he developed could one day be used to help calculate the amount of electricity that could be produced through wave energy off the North Carolina coast.

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Life in prehistoric rural communities

Carrying shovels, screens and other equipment, 12 students trekked across a tobacco field along the Yadkin River to reach an archaeological site where they began finding artifacts more than 500 years old.