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President Nathan O. Hatch

President Nathan Hatch: Historian

Not every college president has written a book that is required reading for students across the country a quarter century after its publication like President Nathan Hatch’s “The Democratization of American Christianity.”

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Looking back at science and technology in 2014

From bats to blue-footed boobies and beyond, 2014 was a memorable year for Wake Forest when it came to science and technology news.

Junior Kali Vicars, studied the painting "Witch Duck Creek" by Joshua Shaw (1820-1821) at Reynolda House Museum of American Art for her Women and Gender in Early America history course.

Art history detectives

History professor Michele Gillespie usually includes class visits to view art in Winston-Salem. This semester, she expanded the idea to benefit both the students in her Women and Gender in Early America course and the local museums.

Wake Forest physics professor Timo Thonhauser, center, demonstrates an alternative energy source to elementary school students at Sciworks.

Hands on with hydrogen

Schoolchildren visiting SciWorks science museum learn hands-on about alternative fuels like hydrogen with help from associate professor of physics Timo Thonhauser.

STEM incubator project partners and mentor, l-r, Jack Janes, Dominic Prado, Paul Pauca and Ran Chang.

Sonar-assisted human navigation

STEM incubator brings students from different classes and disciplines together, fostering horizontal relationships where they learn from each other, but also vertical relationships with their faculty mentors.

Junior Pierre Duncan explains his chemistry research project.

Research Day, a hallmark event

Research Day is a highlight of the academic year, showcasing the personal interaction and intellectual exchange between students and faculty.

Students Cecilia Rambarat and Julian Gilyard conduct an experiment together.

New eyes on science

Four undergraduate students and their computer science professor, Sam Cho, were recognized for their fresh perspectives on developments in the field of molecular dynamics computer simulations — the subject of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

Ellen Miller on Egyptian dig site.

Fossil has lips like Jagger

When anthropologist Ellen Miller discovered a fossil for a new species with large, signature lips, it gave her great “satisfaction” to name the creature after Rolling Stones front man Mick Jagger.

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A way to save the Amazon?

A solution to reverse Amazon rainforest deforestation is being explored by Wake Forest researchers by creating a new and more effective version of biochar made from native bamboos. Biochar is a kind of fertilizer made by smoldering agricultural plant waste in a specially designed, zero-oxygen kiln.

Wake Forest sophomore Hannah Martin ('17) works with chemistry professor Patricia Dos Santos in her lab in Salem Hall.

Beating bad bacteria

Sophomore Hannah Martin and Patricia Dos Santos, an associate professor of chemistry, are tackling the problem of how to target harmful bacteria while sparing beneficial bacteria that make it possible for humans to live healthy lives.