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Faculty

Junior Pierre Duncan explains his chemistry research project.

Research Day, a hallmark event

Research Day is a highlight of the academic year, showcasing the personal interaction and intellectual exchange between students and faculty.

Instruction librarian Amanda Foster adjusts Google Glass for Allie Chambers ('17)

Through the Google Glass

In “Accessing Information in the 21st Century,” an instruction librarian incorporates Google Glass into class as a catalyst to research, discuss and explore information-related themes, such as privacy and social responsibility.

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Evening the odds

Despite losing her vision three years ago, Kathryn Webster entered Wake Forest last fall with the goal of pursuing a dual degree in mathematics and business. Faculty and staff found a novel suite of technologies to help her see math clearly.

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Professor elected to Institute of Medicine

Wake Forest University Law and School of Medicine Public Health Sciences Professor Mark Hall has been elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), a subset of the prestigious National Academy of Sciences.

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Building community

More than 50 years after Martin Luther King Jr. spoke at Wake Forest, universities across the country are making headlines related to race and identity. At a time when Wake Forest has a more diverse study body than ever, the campus community is addressing these challenges together.

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Wake Forest “Hits the Bricks” for cancer

A Wake Forest tradition, Hit the Bricks is an eight-hour relay race along the brick pathways of Hearn Plaza in honor of Brian Piccolo, a Wake Forest alumnus and Chicago Bears running back who died of cancer at age 26.

Students Cecilia Rambarat and Julian Gilyard conduct an experiment together.

New eyes on science

Four undergraduate students and their computer science professor, Sam Cho, were recognized for their fresh perspectives on developments in the field of molecular dynamics computer simulations — the subject of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

David Hughes works on software for Intel's Connected Wheelchair Project.

Internship on the world’s stage

David Hughes (’15), a computer science major, spent the past five months working on Intel’s Connected Wheelchair Project, which was unveiled at Intel’s annual development conference held mid-September in San Francisco. The Connected Wheelchair Project received international attention as a result of an endorsement from world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking.

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Recognized for addressing stress

U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges 2015 guidebook, which hits newsstands this week, highlights Wake Forest’s leadership in the national trend of promoting students’ social and emotional wellbeing. The story shows how schools like WFU tackle stress to provide a better environment for students.

Professor Ron Neal  explores connections between hip hop and religion.

What can religion teach us about Jay-Z?

Students in professor Ron Neal’s religion class explore the connections between hip hop and the stories we’ve all grown up with as Americans — the idea of the self-made man, the achievement of the American dream and the belief that hard work will lead to the good life.