Stories this week at Wake Forest

CAMPAIGN GOAL TO BE ANNOUNCED AT PARADE OF DEACONS

A parade of colorful, 7-foot-tall Demon Deacons will lead the public kickoff of Wake Forest’s new capital campaign today at 4 p.m. Students, faculty, staff and volunteers will gather on University Plaza (the Quad) for the unveiling and parade of the tall, fiberglass versions of the famed Wake Forest mascot, the Demon Deacon. Students decorated the Deacons in a variety of themes ranging from last fall’s presidential debate at Wake Forest to student volunteerism. At the parade, the News Service will provide media with the campaign’s goal and the amount raised to date. To arrange interviews this afternoon with staff involved with the capital campaign and students involved in decorating the Deacons, contact the News Service. Media parking will be in Lot N, alongside the Quad.

WEB PAGE PROVIDES MEDIA WITH COMMENCEMENT 2001 FACTS

Looking for a quick-glance fact sheet about Wake Forest’s commencement? Go to the News Service Web site (www.wfu.edu/wfunews) and click on “Commencement Facts.” Everything from how many graduates will march to where media can park can be found at this link, designed specifically for media needs. The page will be updated regularly. Questions about the 2001 commencement? Call or e-mail the News Service (smithsr@nullwfu.edu).

WFU RESEARCHERS STUDY HOW EXERCISE AFFECTS BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS

For the first time, exercise has been linked to breast cancer survivors’ quality of life in a recent study at Wake Forest University. Shannon Mihalko, assistant professor of health and exercise science, led the study on the Reynolda Campus with fellow researchers from the department and from the Wake Forest School of Medicine. “This research suggests the need to include exercise in treatment plans for women recovering from breast cancer,” she says. They studied 60 women who were recovering from breast cancer, ages 52-77. The results showed that having recently faced the disease, these women were physically and mentally more receptive to exercise intervention. The next phase of the study begins in May, when the research team will conduct an exercise intervention study on another group of women to find out how exercise influences their overall quality of life over time. For more information, or to arrange an interview with Mihalko or other researchers, contact the News Service.

DOWN YEAR FOR EMPLOYMENT, STILL GOOD FOR WFU SENIORS

Even though the market is down, job-seeking seniors at Wake Forest are still getting calls from employers. “We’ll network one-on-one if we have to,” says Bill Currin, director of Wake Forest’s Career Services. “We’re aware of the current market situation and are prepared to deal with it.” Currin and staff have placed more emphasis on teaching students how to network this spring and are bringing in more companies to recruit from the pool of prospective employees. They are also working harder, earlier to connect students with potential employers. “The recruitment process is much more serious and refined now,” he says. “Getting an early start is critical in this market.” To learn more about the job outlook for Wake Forest seniors, contact the News Service.

EXERCISE FOR HEALTH, NOT OUTWARD APPEARANCE

Almost swimsuit time and still haven’t lost those extra winter pounds? Forget about it, says Don Bergey, exercise coordinator for Wake Forest’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program. He says to try exercising for how it makes you feel inside, rather than how it makes you look. “Changing your perspective on why you’re exercising can help you stick to a exercise plan,” he says. “Instead of immediate results, you’re focused on bettering your health and that can have a lasting influence.” To speak with Bergey about following this strategy, contact the News Service.

GRANT WILL HELP CONNECT COMMUNITY WITH CLASSROOMS

The new Pro Humanitate Fund for Service-Learning in Action-from an anonymous $384,000 grant-will help faculty integrate community service into their courses at Wake Forest University. “Professors want to explore how student’s knowledge can help the community,” says Paige Wilbanks, director of volunteer services at Wake Forest. Service-learning involves using community service to complement and enhance classroom learning. The new program will build on the success of the Academic and Community Engagement (ACE) Fellowship program that introduces selected faculty to service-learning techniques so they can include community service as course requirements. The new fund will allow more professors to complete this training and will also provide grants to faculty engaged in community-based research. For examples of service learning in Wake Forest classrooms, contact the News Service.

Categories: Events, Research, School of Medicine, University Announcement