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Personal and Career Development

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What can I do with an English major?

Wake Forest helps students answer questions about the connections between major and career — giving them confidence as they meet with potential employers and learn how to talk about what talents and skills they bring to the workplace.

David Hughes works on software for Intel's Connected Wheelchair Project.

Internship on the world’s stage

David Hughes (’15), a computer science major, spent the past five months working on Intel’s Connected Wheelchair Project, which was unveiled at Intel’s annual development conference held mid-September in San Francisco. The Connected Wheelchair Project received international attention as a result of an endorsement from world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking.

Wake Forest sophomore Hannah Martin ('17) works with chemistry professor Patricia Dos Santos in her lab in Salem Hall.

Beating bad bacteria

Sophomore Hannah Martin and Patricia Dos Santos, an associate professor of chemistry, are tackling the problem of how to target harmful bacteria while sparing beneficial bacteria that make it possible for humans to live healthy lives.

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Gold is the new green

Wake Forest Chemist Amanda Jones is the recipient of the National Science Foundation’s prestigious Career Award. Jones will use the $390,000 in award funding to study powerful and environmentally friendly gold catalysts for use in the pharmaceutical industry.

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A programmer’s approach to problem solving

An iPhone app developed by a team of Wake Forest freshmen could one day enable patrons at campus restaurants to vote for what songs play over the speakers.

Seniors Nayan Hussain and Elizabeth Law work on creating visual maps that will help them think about possible career paths.

Visual maps provide career direction

Students are learning to better navigate their career paths by creating vision maps that capture the patterns and themes in life’s most significant moments and connect them to possible choices after graduation.

Students in the photo are from left to right:
Andy Bowline, Alison Arter, Kyle Murrah, Janel Suburu, John Hodnette and Gonzo Estupinan

From bench to bedside

Move over, pink. The fight against breast cancer now wears Old Gold and Black as a team of graduate students from Wake Forest Schools of Business, Law and Medicine work together to take a promising, but underfunded, cancer therapy to market.

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Plotting a green career path

A new masters program created by Wake Forest’s Center for Energy, the Environment & Sustainability (CEES) will give students and early career professionals the diverse skillset they need to carve out a place in the burgeoning global sustainable business market.

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Imagining the next ‘big idea’

James Beshara (’08), CEO and co-founder of Crowdtilt, a social group-funding platform, came to campus to meet with student innovators and shared ideas with faculty on how to prepare students to launch start-ups after graduation.

Five tips for navigating the Forest

1) Get out and explore “Welcome to Wake Forest! I hope your experience here broadens the mind, strengthens the body, and inspires the spirit. Find your niche by joining one of more than 150 student organizations or simply relax by enjoying the outdoor spaces on Hearn Plaza. I’m new here, too, so let’s take in […]