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Personal and Career Development

Wake Forest first-year students symbolically launch their career journeys in Wait Chapel with colored paper airplanes.

Wake Forest one of ‘50 Colleges That Create Futures’

Wake Forest University is featured in “Colleges That Create Futures: 50 Schools That Launch Careers by Going Beyond the Classroom” — a new Princeton Review book highlighting the nation’s best institutions.


Careers get real in D.C.

Sixty-two undergrads with 19 different majors traveled to Washington this summer to learn the ins and outs of careers in banking, politics, real estate and more from 40 Wake Forest alumni who’ve settled in the nation’s capital.


Finding the golden nuggets in big data

Teaching students how to manage and analyze data is at the core of a new five-week immersive experience at the School of Business. The Summer Business Analytics Program is designed for rising college juniors, seniors or recent graduates with a strong background in math.

Caroline Robinson of the Environmental Protection Agency meets with a group of students during the STEM Slam, a speed-dating style networking opportunity hosted by Wake Forest's Office of Personal and Career Development.

STEM careers ‘speed-dating’ style

Wake Forest’s first STEM Slam brought together students who were looking for job opportunities with companies who were looking for potential employees. If that sounds like your typical career fair, it wasn’t. CEO and founder of Dress for Success Nancy Lublin inspires students to make the world a better place.

Changing the world with $5,000

As part of the Leadership Project, Nancy Lublin, founder of Dress for Success and, offered advice on launching startups and leading organizations with the purpose of making life better for people in need.

Ty Kraniak, who conducted research in Ecuador, is joining the Peace Corps after graduation — launching a career in global public health.

WFU grads are launching careers

With 98 percent of the Class of 2014 either employed or in graduate school, the numbers show that resources invested in career development have measurable results. But the first job after college is just one step in the journey toward a meaningful life.


What can I do with an English major?

Wake Forest helps students answer questions about the connections between major and career — giving them confidence as they meet with potential employers and learn how to talk about what talents and skills they bring to the workplace.

David Hughes works on software for Intel's Connected Wheelchair Project.

Internship on the world’s stage

David Hughes (’15), a computer science major, spent the past five months working on Intel’s Connected Wheelchair Project, which was unveiled at Intel’s annual development conference held mid-September in San Francisco. The Connected Wheelchair Project received international attention as a result of an endorsement from world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking.

Wake Forest sophomore Hannah Martin ('17) works with chemistry professor Patricia Dos Santos in her lab in Salem Hall.

Beating bad bacteria

Sophomore Hannah Martin and Patricia Dos Santos, an associate professor of chemistry, are tackling the problem of how to target harmful bacteria while sparing beneficial bacteria that make it possible for humans to live healthy lives.


Gold is the new green

Wake Forest Chemist Amanda Jones is the recipient of the National Science Foundation’s prestigious Career Award. Jones will use the $390,000 in award funding to study powerful and environmentally friendly gold catalysts for use in the pharmaceutical industry.